The Triple A Test


The Triple A test helps you understand your risk of an attack. Asthma attacks hospitalise someone every seven minutes - don't let it be you.

If you are under 12 or a parent of a child with asthma who is under 12, please click here

Find out your risk of an asthma attack by taking the Triple A Test.


At the end of the test, we'll give you advice on what to do to avoid asthma attacks, as well as information to help if you do have an attack.
Nurse showing a child how to use an inhaler with a Small Volume Spacer

National Review of Asthma Deaths

Most people don’t think they’re at risk of a potentially fatal asthma attack. But in reality, 75% of people with asthma are not in control of their symptoms and every day, three people die.

Click here to read more

How you can help us to reduce hospital admissions

Debbie Waddell from Asthma UKAsthma UK is currently funding some fantastic projects which are having real impact and keeping people with asthma out of hospital. You can donate to help fund this work here

We're working in asthma hotspots across the UK, such as Ealing in West London. In a joint project with NHS Ealing, asthma nurse specialist Debbie Waddell (left) was tasked with working across local communities to reduce the impact of asthma on children's lives.

Before the project began, hospital admissions for children in Ealing were the highest in London and the tenth highest in England. Since coming on board in 2009, Debbie has made excellent progress. She has ensured 2,500 schools and early year's staff have received asthma training and has worked closely with GP practices to run clinics targeting children who have been admitted to hospital in the past, which has helped to reduce admissions. NHS Ealing anticipates that average savings of around £50,000 on admissions per year will be achieved by the project.

Debbie says: 'By helping parents and school staff understand how serious asthma is, we not only want to reduce admissions but ultimately hope to prevent further children dying from asthma. Parents, teachers and school nurses have told me that they feel more empowered by their increased understanding as a result of the project and have been able to manage children's asthma more effectively.'


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